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Nursing is a diverse discipline, and as such programs and prerequisites vary widely. When planning your coursework, please make an appointment with the Office of Medical and Health Programs and bring a list of your top 10 schools to the appointment.

Nursing is a rewarding and growing field of study.  Students matriculating from a liberal arts institution like Sewanee can pursue several options for post-graduate nursing education.  Nursing schools offer a variety of nursing degrees from master’s level (MSN) to doctoral level (DNP or PhD).  These programs often have an accelerated path for students with BA or BS degrees to get their RN license and continue on toward their graduate degree (an example is Vanderbilt's Masters in Nursing (MSN) program).  The specific academic requirements vary by school, and you should check course prerequisites for each school to which you plan to apply. The Office of Medical and Health Programs is available to help you plan your schedule and to help find equivalent Sewanee coursework.

There are many pathways to becoming a nurse. Accelerated BSN and direct-entry MSN programs are both designed for individuals who already have a baccalaureate or graduate degree in a non-nursing field. If you are interested in a research career or advanced practice nursing, you should also consider earning a PhD or DNP.

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (ABSN) Programs

ABSN programs are the fastest way to become a registered nurse (RN). You can earn an accelerated BSN in 11–18 months, depending on the program. The pace of these programs is intense, and you will earn the same amount of clinical hours as someone in a traditional BSN program. ABSN programs in our area include Belmont University, East Tennessee State University, Emory University, Samford University, the University of Memphis, and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has compiled a list of accelerated baccalaureate programs by state.

Course Requirements
Course requirements vary by school, so research your programs early and make sure your Sewanee schedule accommodates these requirements.

Many schools require the courses listed below. Requirements vary substantially, so please consult with the Office of Medical and Health Programs when planning your coursework. 

Biology 
Note that BIOL 133 and BIOL 233 are non-lab courses that are prerequisites for required upper level biology lab courses. CHEM 120/150 is a prerequisite for Microbiology.

Many programs require all of the following courses:
BIOL 180: Principles of Human Nutrition or BIOL 218: Principles of Animal Nutrition and Metabolism
BIOL 203: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy or BIOL 270: Human Anatomy
BIOL 312/314: General and Human Physiology 
BIOL 340: Microbiology 

Mathematics and Statistics
Some schools require statistics, while others require a college-level math class or have no requirement.
STAT 204: Elementary Statistics

One or More of the Following Psychology Courses
Note that PSYC 100/101 is a prerequisite for the upper-level courses listed below, and PSYC 251 is a prerequisite for PSYC 357. 
Requirements vary widely and are specific. Please check your schools’ requirements and consult with the Office of Medical and Health Programs when planning your course schedule.
PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology or PSYC 101: Principles of Psychology
PSYC 202: Abnormal Behavior
PSYC 221: Adolescence 
PSYC 222: Adult Development and Aging
PSYC 357: Child Development 

Chemistry
CHEM 120 General Chemistry (Lab) or CHEM 150 Advanced General Chemistry (Lab)
Some schools, including the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, require a second semester of chemistry with lab.  Below are inorganic chemistry courses that will satisfy the second semester of chemistry for most schools that require an additional course:
CHEM 210 Solution and Solid State Chemistry (Lab)
CHEM 308 Inorganic Chemistry (Lab)
CHEM 352 Thermodynamics and Kinetics (Lab)

Some schools also require courses in or sociology (MHUM 110) and two semesters of English. 
Many Sewanee students fulfill the English requirement with the following courses:

  • ENGL 101 Literature and Composition + ENGLXXX 
  • HUMN (with GFWI) + ENGLXXX 
  • WRIT courses also are accepted by some schools

Some schools have additional requirements, such as a religion courses or bioethics/medical ethics.
PHIL 235: Bioethics may fulfill the medical ethics requirement.

Direct-Entry Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Programs

Direct-entry MSN programs, also referred to as accelerated MSN programs, typically require 2-3 years. Typically, you will cover BSN-level content during your first year. By the end of your first year, you will be prepared to sit for your National Council for Licensure Exam (NCLEX) to become a registered nurse (RN). The following year(s) will vary substantially depending on your program and field. MSN programs can prepare you for a variety of careers, including clinical nurse leader (CNL) and advanced practice nursing (APRN). Advanced practice nursing roles include nurse practitioner (NP), certified nurse-midwife (NMW), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), or clinical nurse specialist (CNS).

Direct-entry dual degree programs, such as MSN/MPH and MSN/MBA are options for those seeking more than one degree.

Since MSN programs vary so widely, instead of providing a list of suggested coursework we ask students to bring a list of their top 10 nursing schools to an advising appointment with the Office of Medical and Health Programs. For an example of prerequisites for a direct-entry MSN program, please review our 4-2 program with Vanderbilt University’s School of Nursing.

 

Sewanee-Vanderbilt Liberal Arts-Nursing 4-2 Affiliation

Sewanee has an affiliation with Vanderbilt School of Nursing, in which students interested in getting a Masters in Science Nursing (MSN) earn a Sewanee B.A. or B.S. and then go on to earn a Vanderbilt MSN. Sewanee will recommend only those students who have fulfilled the prerequisites for the educational experience at Vanderbilt. Students are further expected to have patient experiences and have shown a persistent desire to become a nurse. The academic prerequisites include completion of the Sewanee courses listed below. Incoming freshmen are encouraged to complete PSYC 100 or 101 and BIOL 133 as early as possible. Please note that several courses have prerequisites and you should plan you schedule accordingly. The Office of Medical and Health Programs is available to help you plan your schedule.

Biology 
Note that BIOL 133 and BIOL 233 are non-lab courses that are prerequisites for required upper level biology lab courses. CHEM 120/150 is a prerequisite for Microbiology and a pre- or co-requisite for BIOL 233.
BIOL 180: Principles of Human Nutrition or BIOL 218: Principles of Animal Nutrition and Metabolism
BIOL 203: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy or BIOL 270: Human Anatomy
BIOL 312/314: General and Human Physiology 
BIOL 340: Microbiology 

Statistics
STAT 204: Elementary Statistics

One of the Following Psychology Courses
Note that PSYC 100/101 is a prerequisite for these courses, and PSYC 251 is a prerequisite for PSYC 357. One of the following courses is required.  
PSYC 221: Adolescence 
PSYC 222: Adult Development and Aging
PSYC 357: Child Development 

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Programs

Students pursuing a terminal degree in nursing can choose doctoral programs focused on practice (DNP) or scholarship and research (PhD). A doctoral degree will provide you with leadership opportunities, such as faculty and research positions. There is also a move towards the DNP becoming the recommended degree for advanced practice nurses. Most students earn an MSN before matriculating into a doctoral program, but there are “fast-track” baccalaureate to doctoral degree programs that allow you to earn a PhD or DNP directly after your BSN. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing maintains a searchable database that allows you to search for doctoral programs designed for those with BSNs or MSNs.

Tutoring

Succeeding in the pre-health curriculum
The pre-health curriculum consists of a diverse array of coursework, much in the STEM fields. These courses are often extremely rigorous in order to provide students with the background skills and knowledge they need to succeed in health care fields. The Office of Medical and Health Programs (OMHP), partnering with the Sewanee Health Professions Society (SHPS), provides both leadership development opportunities for students interested in tutoring and one-on-one peer tutoring for students seeking tutoring. All peer tutors have not only succeeded in the courses in which they tutor, but they have also been shown to be good teachers and mentors.

For the academic year 2018-2019 the student leader of this program is Gil Horner.  If you have questions please refer them to Gil or Assistant Director Cynthia Gray.  

Those applying to be tutors need to fill out forms with Human Resources after being given approval from the Office of Medical and Health Programs. Time sheets also need turned in at a timely manner.

Those who have a tutor may be asked to evaluate their experience so we may provide the best mentorship and tutoring program for students. 

Apply to be a tutor here.

Request a tutor here.